Posts tagged 19th Century
We'wha

A life dedicated, from birth, to bridging divides…

That's We'wha's story.

Born in New Mexico in 1849, a member of the A:Shiwi (or “Zuñi”) tribe of North America, We’wha (WAY-wah) has gone down in history as one of the most famous Zuñi lhamana (LHA-mana), or “Two-Spirits,” – individuals who occupy a distinct, third gender whose role in their community went beyond understood white American social conventions of the time. Anthropologist Matilda Stevenson, who spent her professional life studying North American women and families, used feminine pronouns to describe We'wha, claiming she "could never think of her faithful and devoted friend in any other light."

And it's true...

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Mary Anning

Do you believe anyone is capable of an amazing discovery, regardless of class or gender?

Mary Anning did.

Mary Anning was born in 1799, in a coastal village in Dorset, England. Hers was a working-class family and existence was tough. Short of food and creature comforts, the family also suffered through frequent seaside storms. These were sometimes so severe, Mary and her family had to climb out the second-floor windows of their home to escape the flooding. 

But it is said that every storm brings a silver lining. And, indeed, the wind and rain brought good fortune to the Annings in addition to hardship. This luck sent young Mary on a path to both career and accidental fame...

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